Online dating and romance scams: How to spot and avoid them

Online dating and romance scams: How to spot and avoid them

One Scammer at a Time The fraudsters behind the often laughable Nigerian prince email scams have long since branched out into far more serious and lucrative forms of fraud, including account takeovers, phishing, dating scams, and malware deployment. Combating such a multifarious menace can seem daunting, and it calls for concerted efforts to tackle the problem from many different angles. This post examines the work of a large, private group of volunteers dedicated to doing just that. A typical BEC scam involves phony e-mails in which the attacker spoofs a message from an executive at a company or a real estate escrow firm and tricks someone into wiring funds to the fraudsters. However, BEC scams succeed thanks to help from a variety of seemingly unrelated types of online fraud — most especially dating scams. Tokazowski is an expert on the subject thanks to his founding in of the BEC Mailing List, a private discussion group comprising more than experts from a cross section of security firms, Internet and email providers and law enforcement agents that is dedicated to making life more difficult for scammers who perpetrate these schemes.

Online shopping scams

A rich relative, hitherto unknown, has died in Africa leaving millions of dollars unclaimed. An African “lawyer” wants you to inherit – but you first have to pay fees via Western Union. Fake money picture often sent by the fraud criminals. These are what they call “trunk boxes”. The criminals will send junk mail using anonymous e-mail addresses they picked up from Yahoo, Hotmail, Myway, Netscape and other mail service providers.

They might say that they represent a toppled African dictator, or a bank administering the estate of a rich expatriot who died in a “ghastly accident”.

Transitioning from the traditional Nigerian scam, a California woman lost a huge chunk of money when she got caught up in an online dating scam that started on

A wealthy foreigner who needs help moving millions of dollars from his homeland promises a hefty percentage of this fortune as a reward for assisting him. Letters or, nowadays, e-mail messages postmarked from Nigeria or Sierra Leone, or the Ivory Coast, or almost any other foreign nation are sent to addresses taken from large mailing lists. The letters promise rich rewards for helping officials of that government or bank, or quasi-government agency or sometimes just members of a particular family out of an embarrassment or a legal problem.

Should you agree to participate in this international bail-out, something will go wrong. Paperwork will be delayed. Questions will be asked. Officials will need to be bribed. Money from you — an insignificant sum, really, in light of the windfall about to land in your lap — will be required to get things back on track. In a nutshell, the con works by blinding the victim with promises of an unimaginable fortune.

Once the sucker is sufficiently glittery-eyed over the prospect of becoming fabulously rich, he is squeezed for however much money he has. In another form taken by the Nigerian scam, a church or religious organization is contacted by a wealthy foreigner who says he desires nothing more than to leave his considerable fortune to that particular group. Only when he tries to collect the money is he approached for payment of facilitation fees to get his winnings to him.

The scam is known as the Nigerian scam, but many countries are routinely named as the homelands the appeals originate from.

One more step

After a rough divorce the year before, she was thrilled to meet a man who shared her religion, interests, and love of children and animals. Then one day Eric called in a panic, saying his passport had been stolen. Candace wired him the small sum without hesitation — but when he contacted her a few weeks later saying he needed a much bigger sum to pay legal bills, she realized she was being scammed.

nigerian internet dating scam. An advance-fee scam is a form of fraud and one of the types of confidence scam typically involves promising the victim a significant share of a large sum of money, in return for a small up-front payment, which the fraudster requires in .

Nok sculpture, terracotta The Nok civilisation of Northern Nigeria flourished between BC and AD , producing life-sized terracotta figures that are some of the earliest known sculptures in Sub-Saharan Africa. The Kingdom of Nri of the Igbo people consolidated in the 10th century and continued until it lost its sovereignty to the British in Nri and Aguleri , where the Igbo creation myth originates, are in the territory of the Umeuri clan.

Members of the clan trace their lineages back to the patriarchal king-figure Eri. The oldest signs of human settlement at Ife’s current site date back to the 9th century, [36] and its material culture includes terracotta and bronze figures. Middle Ages — Further information: History of Nigeria — Oyo, at its territorial zenith in the late 17th to early 18th centuries, extended its influence from western Nigeria to modern-day Togo.

The Edo’s Benin Empire is located in southwestern Nigeria. Benin’s power lasted between the 15th and 19th centuries. Their dominance reached as far as the city of Eko an Edo name later changed to Lagos by the Portuguese and further. The territory controlled by the resultant state included much of modern-day northern and central Nigeria; it lasted until the break-up of the Empire into various European colonies.

How to spot a scammer

Consumers who have been contacted by scammers could have had their personal information breached. ScamGuard highly recommends that consumers whose information has been breached obtain identity theft protection service immediately. There are several companies that offer identity theft protection in the US. One of the most inexpensive options we were able to find is the protection offered by LifeLock.

You can start your protection here. The information and opinions contained on this site are not endorsed by LifeLock.

Nigerian Scams, Romance Scams: They Still Work! by: Nigerian Scams / Scam First, the fraudster creates a fake account at an online dating service. Then, he or she contacts victims (individuals looking for love) directly, and begins developing a virtual relationship. Once the fraudster has made the victim feel something for the.

Advertisement About Nigerian scams After they establish some lovely correspondence with you, fall in love and maybe even send a couple of cheap presents, they will either: They will send you the Money Orders or checks and ask you to deposit them into your bank account and then wire the money to them via Western Union. Usually they say to keep some money for your trouble. Needless to say, those Money Orders or checks are no good, and not even worth the paper they’re printed on.

If you cash them or deposit them into your account, Money Orders or checks will come back after few weeks as fraudulent and you will be responsible for paying back the money to the bank and sometimes even charged for passing counterfeit instrument. There is also a re-shipping scam, when they will ask you to re-ship goods for them. These goods are purchased with stolen credit cards. Never re-ship anything for strangers, especially to Africa. There is a reason why online merchants usually don’t ship there.

Names of Scammers and Names Used in Nigerian Scams

How to spot a scammer by Match Relationship and dating advice from match. Remember that on Match you you are fully in control of your search and can choose to take things at your own pace. The approach that members take to get to know you will always vary. The sort of photos they use as well as the language of the personal ad can help you decide whether the member is genuinely looking for a partner or not.

Spotting Online Dating Scams | Scam-Free Dating Sites. Ways to Spot Common Online Dating Scams. Staying safe online is all about knowing what to look for. Here are some of the most common online dating scams we’ve found in our research and how to avoid them. Once you’re in the know, the power is in your hands.

Victims are usually unsuspecting women, 30 to 55 years old, who believe they are romantically involved with an American Soldier, yet are being exploited and ultimately robbed by perpetrators that strike from thousands of miles away. July 30, — Special Agents from the U. Victims are usually unsuspecting women, 30 to 55 years old, who believe they are romantically involved with an American Soldier, yet are being exploited and ultimately robbed, by perpetrators who strike from thousands of miles away.

The majority of the “romance scams,” are being perpetrated on social media and dating-type websites where unsuspecting females are the main target. The criminals are pretending to be U. The perpetrators will often take the true rank and name of a U. Soldier who is honorably serving his country somewhere in the world, or has previously served and been honorably discharged, then marry that up with some photographs of a Soldier off the internet, and then build a false identity to begin prowling the internet for victims.

Romance scam

But what does it mean when the face on the other end of the scam looks a bit more familiar? That man was me—sort of. Her broken English only served to heighten the sense of disconnect from reality as she explained the details of her affair: Naturally someone would use a photo of me in a situation like this, I thought. The role of the scammer in these ploys is to engender sympathy from the victim in order to convince them to send money.

But after going back and forth with the woman over Facebook, it occurred to me that maybe I was actually the mark of a meta-scam wherein the real scammer is falsely claiming to have been scammed by someone claiming to look like me in order to get the type of sympathy that these sorts of romance scams rely on.

Online dating and romance scams cheat Australians out of millions every year. The money you send to scammers is almost always impossible to recover and, in addition, you may feel long-lasting emotional betrayal at the hands of someone you thought loved you.

From the web How this scam works The scammer will contact you out of the blue by email, letter, text message or through social media. Or they may tell you about a large inheritance that is ‘difficult to access’ because of government restrictions or taxes in their country. The scammer will then offer you a large sum of money to help them transfer their personal fortune out of the country.

Scammers may ask for your bank account details to ‘help them transfer the money’ and use this information to later steal your funds. Or they may ask you to pay fees, charges or taxes to ‘help release or transfer the money out of the country’ through your bank. These fees may even start out as quite small amounts. If paid, the scammer may make up new fees that require payment before you can receive your reward.

They will keep asking for more money as long as you are willing to part with it. You will never be sent the money that was promised. Warning signs You receive a contact out of the blue asking you to ‘help’ someone from another country transfer money out of their country e. The request includes a long and often sad story about why the money cannot be transferred by the owner. This typically involves some type of conflict or inheritance and they may want to move the money straight into your account.

You are offered a financial reward, such as a share in the amount, for helping them access their ‘trapped’ funds.

Nigerian Scams Documentary 2016 : Nigerian Scammers Show No Mercy !


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